Magazine maker – Optimist Mag http://optimistmag.org/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 22:36:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.2 https://optimistmag.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/optimist-150x150.png Magazine maker – Optimist Mag http://optimistmag.org/ 32 32 Relatives of Dayton Shooting Victims Sue Gun Magazine Maker | Ohio News https://optimistmag.org/relatives-of-dayton-shooting-victims-sue-gun-magazine-maker-ohio-news/ Tue, 03 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://optimistmag.org/relatives-of-dayton-shooting-victims-sue-gun-magazine-maker-ohio-news/ By ANDREW WELSH-HUGGINS, Associated Press COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) – The high-capacity magazine used by the man who shot nine people in Dayton two years ago does no more than allow the murder of as many people as possible, the family members of four alleged victims in a lawsuit against the magazine’s maker. The lawsuit filed […]]]>

By ANDREW WELSH-HUGGINS, Associated Press

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) – The high-capacity magazine used by the man who shot nine people in Dayton two years ago does no more than allow the murder of as many people as possible, the family members of four alleged victims in a lawsuit against the magazine’s maker.

The lawsuit filed on Sunday in Nevada accuses magazine maker Kyung Chang Industry USA Inc. of deliberately marketing and selling 100-round magazines of the type used by Dayton mass shooter Connor Betts in the August 4 attack. 2019.

The company has made and sold 100-round magazines fully aware that they “have no or negligible utility for lawful uses of firearms, but pose a huge risk to public safety because they are extremely effective and attractive for use in illegal mass shootings, ”the lawsuit said.

The magazine allowed Betts to fire 41 shots in 32 seconds in the Dayton, Oregon entertainment district before being killed by police, according to the lawsuit.

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The magazine’s ability “allowed the Shooter to transform the popular shopping district into a war zone, in seconds,” the lawsuit said.

Relatives of the victims are seeking unspecified financial damages in excess of $ 15,000 and a court order barring the company from supplying high-capacity magazines “without reasonable guarantees to prevent their misuse.”

The complaint was brought by family members of shooting victims Derrick Fudge, Lois Oglesby, Logan Turner and Beatrice Nicole Warren-Curtis.

Messages were left with the company on Tuesday for comment on the lawsuit.

Betts was killed by police half a minute after opening fire on August 4, 2019 in the Oregon District’s crowded entertainment area in Dayton. Armed with an AR-15 style pistol with the extended ammo magazine, Betts killed nine people, including his sister, and injured dozens more.

After the shooting, high school classmates said Betts was suspended years ago for compiling a “hit list” of classmates he wanted to harm. Two of the classmates said Betts was also suspended after arriving at school with a list of female students he wanted to sexually assault.

Police investigators said Betts had “a history of obsessing over violent ideas with mass shootings and expressed a desire to carry out a mass shooting.” The FBI said it found evidence that Betts “examined violent ideologies.”

But authorities have yet to identify a motive or be able to say for sure whether Betts intended to kill his sister, Megan, or whether her death was accidental.

The Ohio Supreme Court has rejected requests from media outlets, including the Associated Press, for copies of Betts’ school records. The court said last year that state law does not allow disclosure of such records without a student’s consent and makes no exceptions if the student is deceased.

Last month, the maker of the gun used in the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting offered some of the families of the victims nearly $ 33 million to settle their lawsuit over how the company marketed the gun. fire to the public.

Copyright 2021 Associated press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Gunmaker Henderson sued for mass shooting https://optimistmag.org/gunmaker-henderson-sued-for-mass-shooting/ Tue, 03 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://optimistmag.org/gunmaker-henderson-sued-for-mass-shooting/ A wrongful death lawsuit accuses a Henderson company that sells high-capacity magazines of recklessly funneling ammunition into the hands of a mass shooter in Dayton, Ohio. The lawsuit, filed Sunday in Clark County on behalf of the families of four victims, claims that magazine maker Kyung Chang Industry USA Inc. deliberately marketed and sold 100-cartridge […]]]>

A wrongful death lawsuit accuses a Henderson company that sells high-capacity magazines of recklessly funneling ammunition into the hands of a mass shooter in Dayton, Ohio.

The lawsuit, filed Sunday in Clark County on behalf of the families of four victims, claims that magazine maker Kyung Chang Industry USA Inc. deliberately marketed and sold 100-cartridge magazines without any warranties or limitations.

“The shooter needed the instrument of massacre of the accused to accomplish his mission – to quickly kill and terrorize many people,” the lawyers wrote. “The accused needed the shooter to accomplish their mission – to make as much money as possible.”

The magazine’s maker could not be reached for comment on Tuesday.

On August 4, 2019, a gunman used the magazine to fire 41 bullets in 32 seconds in the crowded entertainment district of Dayton, Oregon before being killed by police, according to the complaint.

Armed with an AR-type pistol with an extended ammo magazine, Connor Betts shot 26 people and killed nine, including his sister.

The magazine “helped The Shooter turn the popular shopping district into a war zone,” wrote family lawyers, including Las Vegas attorney Sean Claggett.

The victims included relatives of the plaintiffs Derrick Fudge, 57; Lois Oglesby, 27; Logan Turner, 30; and Nicole Warren-Curtis, 36.

Dion Green was with his father, Fudge, when filming began. His father stood in front of him and took the shots. Fudge died in his arms, the complaint says.

Plaintiff LaSandra James is the mother of Oglesby, who left two daughters.

Oglesby left a phone message after being shot: “I just got shot in the head. I have to go see my children, ”she said, according to the lawsuit.

Plaintiffs Danita and Michael Turner are the mother and father of Logan Turner, a back-to-school machinist who had just bought his first house and a dream car.

Nadine Warren, Warren-Curtis’ mother, is also a complainant in the case. Her daughter was spending an evening with her friend and colleague, Monica Brickhouse, who is also deceased.

The Dayton shooting occurred a week after using similar magazines at the Garlic Festival in Gilroy, Calif., And 13 hours after using them at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, where 23 people were killed.

Similar magazines were used by the shooter on the Las Vegas Strip on October 1, 2017, from the 32nd floor of Mandalay Bay.

Armed with several firearms – including several AR-type rifles – a dozen 100-round magazines and a 40-round magazine, the shooter fired into the crowd at the Route 91 Harvest festival.

A total of 60 people died from their injuries and hundreds more were injured.

Lawyers are seeking damages and a court order to prevent the company from supplying high-capacity magazines without guarantees to prevent their misuse.

Contact Briana Erickson at berickson@reviewjournal.com or 702-387-5244. To follow @ByBrianaE on Twitter.

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Mass shooting victims sue high-capacity magazine maker https://optimistmag.org/mass-shooting-victims-sue-high-capacity-magazine-maker/ Mon, 02 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://optimistmag.org/mass-shooting-victims-sue-high-capacity-magazine-maker/ Candles burn at a memorial at the scene of the Sunday morning mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio, United States on August 5, 2019. REUTERS / Bryan Woolston Summary Law firms Related documents First lawsuit by shooting the victims to exclusively target the magazine maker Plaintiffs want to restrict sales of LCM, unspecified damages The names […]]]>

Candles burn at a memorial at the scene of the Sunday morning mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio, United States on August 5, 2019. REUTERS / Bryan Woolston

  • First lawsuit by shooting the victims to exclusively target the magazine maker
  • Plaintiffs want to restrict sales of LCM, unspecified damages

The names of companies and law firms shown above are generated automatically based on the text of the article. We are improving this functionality as we continue to test and develop in beta. We appreciate comments, which you can provide using the comments tab on the right of the page.

(Reuters) – Survivors of a 2019 mass shooting that killed nine people in Dayton, Ohio sued the maker of the high-capacity magazine that allowed the shooter to fire 41 rounds in 30 seconds without reloading .

In a complaint filed on Sunday in Clark County, Nevada, survivors, along with family members of the deceased victims, said Nevada-based Kyung Chang Industry USA Inc and its South Korean parent company Kyungchang Industry Co Ltd had recklessly sold “slaughter implements without any reasonable warranties, or limitations.”

The plaintiffs, represented by attorneys including Jonathan Lowy of Brady and Benjamin Cooper of Cooper Elliott, are bringing charges of negligence, wrongful death and public nuisance, and seek an injunction banning the 100 magazines in question without reasonable safeguards to prevent abuse. They also seek unspecified pecuniary damages.

A KCI spokesperson could not be reached immediately for comment.

Connor Betts opened fire in a nightlife district in Dayton on August 4, 2019, killing nine people, including his sister, and injuring 17 before being killed by police.

Police then recovered a 100-round Large Capacity Magazine (LCM) that allowed Betts to fire multiple times without reloading.

Plaintiffs in Sunday’s lawsuit said the component was excessively hazardous for any non-military use. They said Betts acquired the magazine from an online retailer identified on KCI’s public website.

“The defendants knew that the LCMs were used on several occasions to slaughter and terrorize Americans in a series of gruesome mass shootings,” they said. “They knew that mass killers are attracted to LCMs because they want them for maximum killings. They knew that the online market was particularly attractive to some killers and their suppliers.”

The plaintiffs said the manufacturer breached its obligation under Nevada law to put in place safety measures that would have prevented the criminal use of their products. These security measures include checks to ensure that 100-cartridge magazines are only sold to people with a legitimate use for them, requiring that all such sales be made in person, and performing criminal background checks.

“I want to make sure that the actions of all those who were responsible that day do not go unanswered, for my grandchildren,” said complainant LaSandra James, mother of one of the victims and guardian of the child of the victim, during a press conference. Monday.

Lawyers for the plaintiffs have said they believe the lawsuit was the first for a shootout targeting exclusively a magazine maker, although magazine makers have been sued alongside other defendants in the past.

Litigation against firearm manufacturers and retailers has often been hampered by the federal Law on the Protection of the Legal Trade in Arms Act, which generally protects defendants from liability for crimes committed with their weapons. However, some state courts have found in recent years that manufacturers can be held liable in certain circumstances, especially if they violate state laws.

The case is Green v. Kyung Chang Industry USA Inc et al, Clark County, Nevada District Court, No. A-21-838762-C.

For the applicants: Jonathan Lowy of Brady; Benjamin Cooper of Cooper Elliott; Joey Mott of Claggett & Sykes; and John Sloan of Sloan, Hatcher, Perry, Runge, Robertson, Smith and Jones

For KCI: not immediately available

Read more:

In less than a minute, an Ohio gunman kills nine people, including his sister

Everytown Law aims to tackle gun violence with new litigation fund

a company press release that came out this week. “Other than that, it offers a lot of premium features not available from other magazine manufacturers. Some of these features are, but not limited to, availability in multiple languages, integration into the library and ease of mobile viewing, the ability to add notes and annotations, self-hosting and much more. others. As a result, the FlipHTML5 team expects to have 2.5 million downloads by the end of March, which will also repeatedly prove the success rate and popularity of this premium magazine maker.

A new concept in digital editions is this notion that not all correlated print editions have to be identical to digital. What the industry has experienced so far is a copy-for-copy replication process that hasn’t really taken full advantage of the capabilities made possible by digital magazines, especially for reading on mobile devices. Recent industry discussions and events have focused on this issue, and it has already been recognized that the industry needs to take a broader view of digital magazines and newspapers.

]]> Raging hacks with Muckraker turned magazine creator Matt Taibbi https://optimistmag.org/raging-hacks-with-muckraker-turned-magazine-creator-matt-taibbi/ Sun, 09 Mar 2014 08:00:00 +0000 https://optimistmag.org/raging-hacks-with-muckraker-turned-magazine-creator-matt-taibbi/ Matt Taibbi, photographed by Christopher Anderson / Magnum Photos / New York Magazine Photo: Christopher Anderson / Magnum Photos / New York Magazine Matt Taibbi, the former enfant terrible of political journalism, limped into a cozy diner on Chambers Street in Tribeca, a Russian-style fur cap pulled over his ears, a half-formed excuse for being […]]]>

Matt Taibbi, photographed by Christopher Anderson / Magnum Photos / New York Magazine
Photo: Christopher Anderson / Magnum Photos / New York Magazine

Matt Taibbi, the former enfant terrible of political journalism, limped into a cozy diner on Chambers Street in Tribeca, a Russian-style fur cap pulled over his ears, a half-formed excuse for being late already on his lips. “I am – I had to – have I kept you wait?”

Informed that he’s actually seven minutes early, his shoulders slump in relief. “Okay,” the gangly 44-year-old said, with a toothy smile. “Good. You’ll have to excuse me. It’s been a crazy time for me.”

This is Matt Taibbi, circa 2014: deferential, polite, very busy. In mid-February, shortly after the birth of his first child, Taibbi announced he was leaving Rolling stone, where he worked for nearly a decade, launching a digital magazine for First Look Media, the company owned by eBay billionaire Pierre Omidyar. The last few weeks have been about business: hiring editorial staff, approving designs. Taibbi won’t discuss the exact format of the new business, or its name – which is still in the works as well – but he sees it focusing, in part, on the same corporate malfeasance issues he covers. since years.

What I hope to capture is the funny yet satirical voice you have with To spy magazine, ”he says. “Everything will probably be a little different from what a lot of people wait.”

What people expect, of course, is the saucy and strongly antagonistic voice of a writer who is, in his own words, “full of outrage”. The guy who compared Goldman Sachs to a “vampire squid wrapped around the face of mankind, relentlessly driving his blood funnel into everything that smells of money.” The reporter who dropped acid, donned a Viking hat and wrap-around sunglasses, and had a casual conversation with the former deputy director of the Bureau of National Drug Policy, the same policymaker responsible for the “Here’s your brain on drugs” ad campaign. And the person who, as editor-in-chief of a Muscovite newspaper, entered the local offices of the Times and slammed a pie filled with horse semen in the face of a reporter he considered a “hack”. Unfiltered and un-intimidated Matt Taibbi who once threw coffee at an interviewer from Vanity Show then I chased him down the street.

But despite his new personal courtesy, none of Taibbi’s anger at the “toothless” media has dissipated. “I think it’s a lost art in this country – developing that narrative voice where readers connect with you as a human being,” he says, harpooning a stray piece of scrambled egg. “They want to see how you individually react to things. And if you think something is outrageous and you write about it in a tone without outrage, then it is only deception, you know?”

Taibbi says his decision to leave Rolling stone was based in part on the need to make a change and “not to be a role model”, and in part by his desire to “be on Glenn’s side”. Glenn being Glenn Greenwald, who, along with Laura Poitras and Jeremy Scahill, currently edit another First Look property, the National Security Center Interception, which has been online since February. “Glenn is in this position of a reporter trying to publish material from a whistleblower, and now they’re both essentially in exile. It’s crazy. If the media that existed in the 60s and 70s saw this situation, they would stand up as one and denounce the government for it, ”Taibbi said.

Like old Washington To post scribe Ezra Klein, who recently moved to a new venture at Vox Media, Taibbi sees hope in the founding and start-up mode of journalism. “You have this widespread distrust of media organizations,” he says, “and the feeling on both sides that the networks are in the reservoir of one political party or another. I think people are more willing to trust individuals than themselves organizations. “

Taibbi grew up on the South Shore of Boston, where he said he was a “depressed” kid, happy to spend the day browsing old Russian novels. “I had to read Dead souls a hundred times, ”he said. “I had this fantasy I was living in 19e– century Russia. (It was his Russophilia that led him to settle there in 1992, where he remained until 2002, working first at the Times, then to exile, a newspaper he helped found with his expatriate compatriot Mark Souls.)

Taibbi’s dad is an Emmy Award winner CNB journalist Mike Taibbi – and along with Gogol and Tolstoy, he also idolized the “middle and working class people” who then populated the newsrooms. “They relished their role of idiots who wouldn’t let anything slip. And I was drawn to it, ”he says. “I mean, reporters should be dark, funny, mean people. It’s appropriate for their antagonist, accusatory role.”

Compare that with today, he argues, when for many journalists, “the attractiveness of work has more to do with proximity to power. They mean they had a beer with Hillary Clinton or whatever. Particularly offensive to Taibbi: the tendency of his peers to go to great lengths to always give the same weight to opposing arguments. “If there is one way of looking at it, and there is another way of looking at it which is totally ridiculous, you don’t have to give this last point of view as much space as some professors of journalism. contemporary might say so. you.”

He wakes up. It’s time to go: the day is full of appointments, and at home in Jersey City, his wife, a family doctor and his son are waiting. But first he wants to take a look at the waitress tattoo. She stretches her hand forward: I FUCKING LOVE YOU, reads a line of blue cursive writing. “Very good”, says Taibbi with appreciation.

Outside, the temperature dropped to 19 degrees. Taibbi, tucked away in an old square coat, says it’s not as cold as when he lived in Moscow, and it’s positively mild compared to climates in Mongolia, where he, at 25, had spent a season playing professional basketball. . The team was the Mountain Eagles; Taibbi was a small striker. “I had met this kid who played street ball in Moscow and he told me about a professional league in Mongolia called the MBA. So I quit my job and took a train to Ulan Bator. They called me ‘the Mongolian Rodman’, ”he says. “I would have stayed. I was having fun. But I caught pneumonia and had to go back to Moscow.”

Taibbi heads south, towards the cloistered streets of the financial district. I wonder aloud if he thinks the work he’s done on Wall Street – on subprime mortgages, the student loan apparatus and the “rat nest teeming with corruption” that led to the 2008 collapse – made a difference.

I think the first clue I got was when Occupy happened, ”he says. “And I could see a lot of the stuff I wrote about was in the background. People carrying papier mache squid at some events which was cool. I think that’s part of what every journalist wants: to make an impact. Yet that impact has only gone so far. None of the operators Taibbi considers to be criminally responsible for the accident has been sanctioned; meanwhile movies like the wolf of Wall Street are, in his opinion, idolizing bankers in a way he finds improper. “It’s kind of the same way they glorified the Mafia once upon a time,” he says. “But at least with the mafia, there was always this lesson that we had at the end, that the crime did not have To pay.”

Taibbi stops at the top of the steps at Fulton Street underground station. “Big companies like Goldman Sachs have billions to spend on their own advertising. They don’t need us to do it for them. And everyone in this world needs us to do it for them, ”he said, waving his hand. “I think of that a parcel.”

* This article appears in the March 10, 2014 issue of new York Magazine.

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